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Bryce 5 Mini Tutorial
Crazy Paving



How to create crazy paving

By David Brinnen & Horo

February 2006

Originally published on davidbrinnen.com

An example of crazy paving

Start up Bryce, select «Create» and click on the mountain.

Figure 1
Figure 2

Click on «E» (Edit) to open the terrain editor.

Figure 3

Change the resolution from the standard «128 - normal» (Bryce 5.0) or «512 - ultra-fine» (Bryce 5.5) to «1024 - massive resolution».

Figure 4

Click on the small white downward arrow next to «Fractal» and select «Mud Cracks» from the drop down menu (last entry).

Figure 5

Now click on «Fractal» until you get a fine pattern, something as shown at left, wich was obtained after the fifth or sixth click.

Figure 6

Click on the «Filtering» tab in the Terrain Editing Tools window.   Move the mouse pointer into the left picture.   This picture is a histogram and shows in the horizontal direction the brightness distribution from black to white for the input picture and in the vertical direction the brightness distribution from black to white for the filtered picture.

The mouse pointer changes into a pencil.   Draw a small rectangle with it.   How this works is best discovered by experimenting.   The result should look similar to what is shown in the picture here.   When done, click on «Apply».

Figure 7

Now, click on the «Elevation» tab.   The control buttons that will be needed are marked with red arrows.

First thing to do is to click on «Invert» to swap the bright and dark parts of the picture.

Figure 8

Click twice or three times on the «Subcontours» button to make the bright lines between the black faces thinner.

If necessary, click again on the button.

If you overdid it, you can go back one step with [Ctrl][z].   The picture shows, what should be obtained by this.

Figure 9

Click again on «Invert» to get back the initial brightness patern.   The faces are now white and the lines black.

Click twice on the button «Smoothing».

Accept the terrain and leave the Terrain Editor.

Figure 10

The terrain has yet to be scaled.   In the example at left, the height is about 1% of the length of the sides, or 2 Bryce Units.   The appearance changes with the depth of the fissures.

For the picture on top, the terrain was copied, inverted, the resolution increased again, Height Noise clicked upon ten times and finally shifted with increased height under the paving. Now, weed grows in the fissures.

Here, the floor to the swimming pool is better maintained and there is weed.